Notes from Camp: Thursday, July 4

NEA’s custom of holding its Annual Meeting over the Independence Day holiday has a number of consequences. One of those was evident this morning, when patriotic garb blossomed throughout the caucus room.

As of yesterday, some 49 NBIs had been submitted. Ohio’s Steering Committee, which meets every morning of the RA at 6:00, had been able to develop recommendations on NBIs through #23, and Ohio delegates considered morning session, followed by NEA’s own Fourth of July celebration, consisting of an inspiring speech by NEA Executive Director John Stocks and a performance of patriotic music by the NEA Choir, which is organized and activated each year for the Representative Assembly. Here’s a look at the confetti explosion that concluded the celebration.

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After a lunch break, delegates began the afternoon session by honoring Donna Schulze, a paraeducator at Phelps Luck Elementary School in Columbia, Maryland, as the 2013 Education Support Professional of the Year.

The RA continued the session by considering more New Business Items, and delegates almost caught up with the Ohio caucus, considering and acting on NBIs through #22. The deadline for submitting NBIs was noon today, and President Van Roekel announced that the RA will have 93 NBIs to consider. (For information about the NBIs, go to nea.org/grants/33354.htm).

That was followed by discussion – but no vote – on several proposed amendments to NEA’s Bylaws and Constitution. Delegates will vote on them tomorrow, but the debate took place today.

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About neoeaxd

Bill Lavezzi serves as Executive Director of the North Eastern Ohio Education Association. NEOEA is a professional association of educators consisting of the nearly 31,000 members of the 192 local OEA and NEA affiliates in northeastern Ohio. Founded in 1869 as the North Eastern Ohio Teachers Association, NEOEA took its present name in 1989 in recognition of the diversity of its members.
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